Love what you do

Erikjan Lantink
5 min readJan 12, 2024

There are eleven thousand business books written on an annual basis. That’s about thirty books per day. So, if you decide to write a business book to get rich and famous, you must be absolutely one hundred percent sure of what you’re doing and how to write that best seller.

Some people succeed. Most don’t. I know people who have written business books. I’ve had realistic conversations with them about the process of writing a book and about expectations. I know it’s tough to get noticed and recognized amongst those many authors. I also know that a small percentage of revenues goes to the author for every book sold.

These are all reasons you need to think twice about your dream of writing a business book. Like many things in life, you must have a clear purpose and vision to chase your dreams.

I’m writing this book because I have a story to tell. A deeply personal story about my experiences, lessons, mistakes and successes, and beliefs on how to design and build a growing and sustainable culture where people love to come to work and where customers always return because they know they get the best experience.

Love what you do

I’m also writing this book because I love the process of writing. It’s one of the things I love to do. Writing helps me to inspire, form, and structure my thoughts. It’s my way of giving meaning to my curiosity and creativity. I’m doing it primarily for myself, but several people have told me sharing my vision is worthwhile. So here it is. In this book.

This book is a business book. It’s about growing a successful business. I leave the definition of success up to you. It may be about growth. It may be about profit. It may be about being the best possible employer. It may be about building the best customer experience. It may be about making a lasting difference in the world. It may be about fulfillment. Whatever it is, my principles apply.

Search for Alignment

One core principle of the book is the search for alignment. Without alignment, the chances of success are smaller. A symphony orchestra will never deliver a great concert if not perfectly aligned. A football team will never be lastingly successful if not aligned. A team of surgeons and their assistants will only…

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Erikjan Lantink

Business & Leadership coach. Interim Leader. Writer. Speaker. Former Retail Executive (general management; operations; HR)